Are we scared to LOVE our lives?

May 13, 2015

Forget everything else. Who are you… as a WOMAN?

May 13, 2015

Why I use THIS word to describe my sexuality

May 13, 2015
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There are two words that have become part of my lexicon that, even a few years ago, would have warranted an eye-roll from me. Or seven.

Goddess.

Sacred.

The idea of the Goddess was so airy-fairy, so dripping with yuck, so reminiscent of patchouli and underarm hair that I dismissed the word absolutely. It was only later that I connected the word to an honour, a celebration and a divine right for every woman to be.

Sacred had the same associations for me until I started to realize that by not treating anything in my life as sacred, I was allowing it to be desecrated. When I started to think of things as being sacred, they became things that I wanted to protect. Things I wanted to nourish and provide for. Things I believed in.

And now that I look back on my life, I see that I was expecting for someone else to treat me like a goddess. For someone else to make me feel sacred. I didn’t feel powerful or worthy enough to claim those words for myself. I didn’t understand yet that it was up to me to choose it first.

I now consider my sexuality sacred. But I didn’t always.

 

 

There were times when I considered my sexuality a ticket to get something I wanted. Something I gave away, even to people who didn’t deserve it. Something that, as a sexually liberated woman, I didn’t think I could withhold if there was a “good enough” offer. I wish I had shared it only with other people who considered it sacred too. But I wasn’t there yet.

I think that a lot of young women aren’t there yet either. They haven’t been taught that their sexuality is for themselves first and that it is sacred. But that’s a BIG topic for another day.

Through my life, I have been on fire with my sexuality. It has exploded my mind and my heart. It has broken my heart. It has brought shame and embarrassment. It has brought me “closer to God” (turn the volume down – or up – depending on how many minors or bosses are in the room…). It has filled me with tears, love, joy, ecstasy, confusion, fear, regret – the whole shebang.

And there have been times, after heartbreak or after a dry spell, where I doubted that I had any sexuality left at all.

And now, I consider it sacred. Sacred because I want to nourish it. Sacred because I want it to be nourished and honoured. Sacred because I believe it has great potential to bring me closer to me. To rock my world. To make me feel ALIVE.

In the Juicy Woman Revolution course, we start to bring our sexuality back to ourselves. To take it away from the hands of lovers and to bring it back home.

For women, it is a huge shift to think of sexuality as something that starts and ends with us and doesn’t just come alive because of or with a partner. Of course, that’s the icing on the cake. Celebrating our sexuality with someone else can be brilliant, mind-expanding, gorgeously life-affirming and all of that. But our sexuality is ours first. We can reclaim, remember, reconnect and re-ignite our sexuality through the breath. Movement. Release. Music. A curve of the hip. An arch of the back. A flip of the hair. Expression. Losing yourself in the flow of your body in a dark warm room.

Sacred sexuality.

If you want to reclaim your sexuality, consider joining my upcoming Thursday night Juicy Woman Revolution course which runs from June 4th – July 23rd, with our graduation on Friday, July 24th.

If you want to know what it feels like to treat your sexuality as sacred, join me.

If you just want to be inside that feeling, to see if it’s still there (it is!), join me.

If we don’t see you this time around, have fun playing with the idea of treating your sexuality as something to protect, nourish and celebrate. It is sacred.

We are sacred.

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1 comment

  1. I love your ideas, Sophie. I, too, work in the east end as a workshop facilitator. This week, for example, I’m gathering women – all wives and mothers – to discuss the question, What does he REALLY want for Father’s Day? I’d love to hear how your June-July course is going and maybe see if there is some overlap in our work. Can I buy you a collegial coffee one day?
    Thanks,
    Stephanie Baptist, M.Ed.

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